A culture of madness?

In the 1960s and into the 1970s the psychotic individual increasingly became positioned both as ‘victim’ and ‘anti-hero’.  Psychiatrists such as Ronald Laing and his colleagues argued that schizophrenia was caused by dysfunctional (if not outright pathological) family relationships, in which the schizophrenic subject found themselves in an impossible, no-win …

Psychoanalysis and schizophrenia

The New York Times recently published a fascinating article by Christopher Bollas in which he describes a five year analysis with a woman whom he calls Lucy and who has a diagnosis of schizophrenia.  What’s particularly interesting about this case is that Lucy lives on a remote island in a …

We are all mad…..

….to paraphrase Lacan (and, indirectly) Freud.  In some ways this seems to be saying nothing new; after all, isn’t part of Freud’s legacy, whether you subscribe to psychoanalysis or not, that we are all, in some way, disturbed?  And doesn’t this mean that we are all either neurotic to some …

Whither anti-psychiatry?

Back in those halcyon days of the late 1960s there were some unlikely heroes, who almost overnight seemed to rise into the stratosphere of celebrity (and cult) status.  One of these was Ronald Laing, a Scottish psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who had some ten years earlier written what must truly be …